Ocean to Ocean Bridge – Connecting a Cross-Country Highway

Yuma, Arizona.

A truss bridge that spans the Colorado River at Yuma is the final highway bridge to connect a road between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Construction completed in 1915, and in 1926, the highway became part of U.S. Route 80, the primary east-west transcontinental highway in the depression era. For a time, the bridge’s deteriorated state resulted in it becoming a pedestrian and bicycle bridge, but after a reconstruction project in 2002, it was restored to vehicle use. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 14 June 2020

Fargo, North Dakota.

Spring flooding has been an issue for many years along the Red River of the North in Fargo. At Lindenwood Park in south Fargo, a pedestrian bridge has linked Lindenwood with Gooseberry Park in Moorhead Minnesota since 1978. During the summer, that bridge joined the two communities but each year during flood season, the City of Fargo would bring large cranes to the site to lift the bridge out of the water to keep the floodwaters from washing the bridge downriver. In 2013, construction was completed on a new lift bridge that features concrete abutments and a lift system that brings the bridge above the 500-year flood level. Continue reading

Fort Morgan – Historic Rainbow Arch Bridge

Fort Morgan, Colorado.

In 1922, the Colorado Bridge and Construction Company began constructing a multi-span, reinforced concrete arch bridge across the South Platte River in eastern Colorado. The bridge was completed in 1923 and named The Rainbow Arch Bridge. Located adjacent to State Highway 52 and a much newer set of highway bridges, the Rainbow Arch Bridge was closed for a time in 2015 to complete repair work and a freshening due to damage and flooding in 2013 and 2015. It is now open again, and like before, it is only used for pedestrian access to nearby Riverside Park. To visit the bridge, take state highway 52 north from I-76 (Exit 80). Continue reading

Gorge Bridge – Spanning the Magnificent Rio Grande

El Prado, New Mexico.

Travel out of Taos, New Mexico west on US Highway 64 a short eight miles (13 km) or so and you will come upon one of the largest steel span bridges in the United States. Opened to traffic in 1965, the long span bridge crosses the large gorge that the Rio Grande River spent millennia creating.  The bridge rises some 650 feet (198 m) above the river and covers the 1200 foot (366 m) gorge in three sections, a 600 foot (183 m) center span is flanked on either side by two 300-foot (91.5 m) approach spans. Continue reading

Weekly Photo Challenge – Bridge

This week, Cheri Lucas Rowlands asks us to think about the things, places or people that connect us. She writes, “You can… capture any type or style of bridge where you are, or go deeper and take a snapshot of something or someone that acts as a bridge in your life.” The entire challenge post can be found here. Continue reading

Valley City – North Dakota’s City of Bridges

Valley City, North Dakota.

Less than one hour’s drive westbound on I-94 from our home in Fargo, the City of Bridges beckons. Our reason to travel to Valley City on this occasion was to find the first National Scenic Highway in North Dakota. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be featuring images captured on that drive. The Sheyenne River Valley National Scenic Byway winds its way through the river valley that is its namesake. A couple of the 27 stops on the byway are found in the city of Valley City. But I digress… Let’s begin our trip through the City of Bridges. Continue reading

Gillespie Dam Bridge

Arlington, Arizona.

On one of our hikes, I was visiting with a hiker friend about places to visit that are “off the beaten path”, places that avoid the hustle and fast paced Interstate highways. Our friend, Leenie told us about just such a place, the Gillespie Dam Bridge. She and her “biker friends” find many of these out-of-the-way places to simply enjoy the journey. Continue reading