Dronie Sunday – 20 October 2019

Moorhead, Minnesota.

The Red River forms the border between North Dakota and Minnesota and is one of the few rivers in the country to flow north, its headwaters begin at the confluence of the Ottertail and Bois de Sioux Rivers near the city of Breckenridge, Minnesota. From there it meanders northward separating the two states until it leaves the United States near the border crossing just north of Pembina, North Dakota. It finally terminates at Lake Winnipeg, the fifth largest lake in Canada. Continue reading

Dronie Sunday – 15 September 2019

Ogallala, Nebraska.

For an upcoming Travel Tuesday, we planned a visit to Lake McConaughy, a manmade lake and popular recreation area in western Nebraska. Today would be the first day I used photos from my airborne camera to add aerial images to my travel posts. I haven’t yet had any negative interactions with bystanders who are understandably curious when they hear that whine and spot the flashing lights on the small drone that I use. Continue reading

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Angles

Fargo, North Dakota.

This week Ann-Christine asks us to look at photography from different angles. As a landscape photographer, I often go to a “new-to-me” place and take oodles of images of the subjects at different angles. The goal of trying different compositions is that something in one of the angles captured adds a little extra something to make it a more interesting photograph. As her contribution to the challenge, she features a couple of fascinating sand sculptures captured from different angles. You can read her entire challenge post here. Continue reading

Dronie Sunday – 18 August 2019

Fargo, North Dakota.

It’s been a month since I’ve shared a “dronie” photo. I haven’t had much of a chance to take photos from the aerial platform. With a trip to Winnipeg and another to Baltimore in the last few weeks, I’ve barely had time to only complete some proficiency flights as a remote pilot. I hope to change that in the next few weeks. In the meantime, I felt it’s time to share another image captured from one of my first attempts at using the remote photo software built into the DJI Go4 application I use to operate the Mavic Air. Continue reading

Dronie Sunday – 14 July 2019

Fargo, North Dakota.

It’s been a rocky start to getting the drone I purchased to automatically update its airspace database information, but after returning it to the manufacturer, they replaced the unit and this one is working properly. Now I am learning more about camera operations having learned to be comfortable flying the airborne camera. I got into drone flying because of Civil Air Patrol. They are ramping up mission training for using drones in several important operations, not the least of which is search and rescue. At some point I expect our ground teams will be able to deploy a drone to search areas where their vehicles or even walking the area is either uncomfortable or hazardous. Continue reading

Dronie Sunday – 30 June 2019

Fargo, North Dakota.

Those accustomed to seeing “Cellpic Sunday” on its usual day may note the name change. No, I haven’t abandoned Cellpic Sunday. In the interest of variety, I decided to mix it up a bit and use the term Drone Sunday when the shot featured is captured from a flying camera platform. Please excuse me while I inflict upon you the results of my learning experiences as I get familiar with the characteristics of drone photography. Cellpic Sunday will be featured whenever the photo was generated from a cellphone, tablet, or other mobile device. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 9 June 2019

Fargo, North Dakota.

OK, so this isn’t technically a Cellpic. It is, however, captured from a truly mobile device. First, the backstory… One of the newest missions of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) involves the use of small unmanned aerial systems, in CAP parlance, sUAS Missions. In the common vernacular, drones. The sUAS class of device weighs between .5 (266 g) and 55 lbs (25 kg). In a word, “small”. In the last couple of years, I’ve gone through the steps needed to become a Commercial sUAS Pilot. The FAA calls this class of license a Part 107 and CAP requires that all of our members who wish to pilot one of these devices hold a Part 107 UAS license. Continue reading