Washington DC – March 2018

Washington D.C.

As a Wing Commander in Civil Air Patrol (CAP), two of the travel duties assigned are attend the National Summer Conference and attend the Winter Command Council meeting, usually in late February or early March. The Command Council is composed of each state’s Wing Commander and Region Commanders. In addition to briefings of importance that must be shared with the membership, each wing delegation meets with every senator and representative from their respective state to brief them on activities performed by CAP in their state. As North Dakota is a small state, our visitation list is quite small, like all states, we have two senators, but we only have a single representative. Minnesota, our neighbor wing to the immediate east has eight representatives to visit. Larger states have to bring a large delegation of CAP members, For example, California Wing must visit their 53 representatives and two senators in the time allocated for our meetings. Long before I reach Washington DC, my Director of Administration has already scheduled my appointments and I know when I need to be in the Senate and House office buildings and where each person I must visit is located in the collection of buildings. Continue reading

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Cellpic Sunday – 22 July 2018

Washington D.C.

This week I finally got around to telling about my Spring trip to our nation’s capital for the Civil Air Patrol’s annual Legislative Day visit with our senators and representatives. That story will be coming soon to a Travel Tuesday post. In the process, I discovered some cell phone photos I captured during my visit. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 13 May 2018

Washington DC.

On a chilly, gray day in early March, finished with our visits in the congressional offices, my colleagues and I walked over to the U.S. Capitol grounds. A couple weeks ago, I shared a cellpic of the Washington Monument as seen from a side portico of the building. Here’s a front view of this beautiful structure. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 29 April 2018

Washington DC.

Late February and early March found me in Washington DC for my annual visit with the North Dakota Senators and our single Congressman. The purpose of the meeting is to let them know what Civil Air Patrol has done for their state in the previous twelve months. After the visits, I stopped with a couple of other CAP members at the Library of Congress. We also found ourselves in front of the U.S. Capitol on a cool and slightly breezy afternoon. An overcast sky didn’t make for impressive images, but as we walked toward the main entrances to the Capitol, I spotted the Washington Monument, visible in the distance from the north side of the Capitol building. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 11 March 2018

Washington, DC.

Founded in 1800, destroyed by British Troops in 1814, the library is the oldest federal cultural institution in the nation as well as the largest library in the world. There are more than 167 million items in the catalog with over 39 million books alone. Laid end to end, there are about 838 miles (1349 km) of shelving. The library is growing, adding about 12,000 items to the collection daily due to the fact that the library is where people register copyright. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 23 April 2017

Washington, D.C.

In early March, I made the annual trip to Washington D.C. to the National Winter Conference for Civil Air Patrol (CAP). Part of that trip’s purpose is for every state’s CAP wing to visit with our Senators and Representatives to brief them on our previous year’s activities in their state. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 5 March 2017

sakakawea-1Washington DC.

This week, I am spending a few days in our nation’s capital on Civil Air Patrol business. For my friends and family in North Dakota, I am bringing home this cellpic of Sakakawea, photographed in the Emancipation Hall at the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center. Sakakawea is linked to North Dakota because as a Shoshone child, she was captured by Hidatsa tribe in what is now North Dakota. Continue reading