Ash Hollow Historic State Park – An Oregon Trail Pioneers “Rest Area”

Mon Jun 7th (1847)

Passed three companies in the evening on a small ravine running into the Platt, it being too full to camp we had the good luck to pass One company of forty three wagons scattered for half a mile on each side of the road, one half of them were fast in the mud. The poor oxen had to pay the bill or bear the blame. They had two Roman Catholics in their company. They were stalking around among the men with their long robes on and their bibles under their arms praying to God to help them out. He didn’t. We passed altogether ninety four wagons in the low bottom on the Platt, a great many fast in the mud. Three miles and camped on the prairie. Fifty one wagons in camp. Continue reading

Lake McConaughy – Nebraska’s Largest Reservoir

Lake McConaughy, Nebraska.

We’ve driven I-80 in Nebraska many times between North Platte and the Interstate’s beginnings west of Ogallala. Our usual goal is Albuquerque by the end of the day, so we don’t have much time to stop. This summer, though, we were only going to Colorado Springs to our family reunion. We could spend a little time in Nebraska rather than just driving through. Last week, we visited Sutherland Reservoir near Sutherland, Nebraska just off I-80, west of North Platte. The next stop after our visit to Sutherland was near Ogallala. Lake McConaughy is a large reservoir of some 35,000 acres or so. As with Sutherland Reservoir, the recreation area is a secondary function. In this case, the project, built in the 1930’s employed about 1500 people during its construction. Continue reading

Dronie Sunday – 15 September 2019

Ogallala, Nebraska.

For an upcoming Travel Tuesday, we planned a visit to Lake McConaughy, a manmade lake and popular recreation area in western Nebraska. Today would be the first day I used photos from my airborne camera to add aerial images to my travel posts. I haven’t yet had any negative interactions with bystanders who are understandably curious when they hear that whine and spot the flashing lights on the small drone that I use. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 16 December 2018

Thomas, Nebraska.

Almost a month ago, I shared an image captured in the Sand Hills of Nebraska and provided some background of the area. A few miles further down the road, I captured a couple of images and created a Sandhill panorama captured just off highway 83 with my Samsung S7 cell phone. In most browsers, you can click on the image to enlarge it for a higher resolution view. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 18 November 2018

North Platte, Nebraska.

On our routine trips between Arizona and North Dakota each fall and spring, I often take US Highway 83 through parts of South Dakota and Nebraska, connecting with I-90 and I-80 in transit. At the I-80 end, after a 10-hour drive (with stops) from Fargo, we overnight at North Platte. Along the way, we pass through the Nebraska Sand Hills.  Continue reading

Golden Spike Tower – Bird’s Eve View of the World’s Largest Train Yard

bailey-yard-1North Platte, Nebraska.

Lynn and I usually stop at North Platte twice a year. It’s an overnight stop on our drive between Buckeye and Fargo each spring and fall. A couple of years ago, I learned that the world’s largest rail switching yard is located just outside of the city, and there is a viewing tower that lets you observe the yard from a higher vantage point. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday (and WPC Half-light) – 27 March 2016

DismalRiverBWThedford, Nebraska.

Late yesterday my wife and I completed our biannual three-day trek between our winter and summer homes. After arriving in Albuquerque on Friday evening, I used my iPad to post my weekly photo challenge response. I didn’t, however, do anything more than the minimum that the challenge requested. I simply posted a photograph taken at dusk. In conjunction with today’s Cellpic Sunday selection, I’d like to submit a second entry to the challenge post for the week. Krista’s challenge involves sharing more than a photo. She adds to the challenge by asking us to link the photograph to a “favorite poem, verse, story, or song lyric.” You can read the entire challenge post here. Continue reading