Bonanzaville – Life in 19th Century North Dakota

West Fargo, North Dakota.

Every community of any size has at least one attraction that locals are aware of and maybe have visited once or twice. Other than that, it’s not considered unless friends or family come to town and you are looking for places to share about your community. In my mind, Bonanzaville is just one of those locations.

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Cellpic Sunday – 29 November 2020

Whidbey Island, Washington.

Between the mainland and Whidbey Island, there is a narrow strip of water that separates Puget Sound from Possession Sound. There is a ferry that travels that passage with terminals at Clinton and Mukilteo. On a cloudy morning, we found ourselves on that ferry. It was the first time I’ve ever been on a “drive-on” ferry. I found the entire process interesting. Continue reading

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Now and Then

First and foremost, publication day for this post is the Thanksgiving holiday in the United States. Even in our current state of political divisiveness and a raging pandemic, we have plenty enough to be thankful for. All year long, but especially during this season, I am grateful for wonderful readers who make my day with every post! Happy Thanksgiving.

This week, both Amy and Ann-Christine provided me with a double-challenge. To be fair, the host of this week’s challenge is Amy. She asks us to focus on our own impressions of our changing times. She writes, “For our challenge this week we’d like you to tell us about your perspective on now vs then – it could be before and after the pandemic or any other changes you have experienced.” You can read her entire challenge post here. Continue reading

Orchard Glen Nature Park – Apples Anyone?

Fargo, North Dakota.

I have a new favorite park in Fargo. Orchard Glen Park came about when property along the Red River was vacated due to excessive flooding in the spring. From the parking lot, a trail descends toward the riverbank and for a distance follows the bend in the river as it swings from northerly to easterly on its way to Canada. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 22 November 2020

Glacier National Park, Montana.

Our visit to Glacier was marred by heavy haze and smoke due to the many wildfires in our western states. As they say, “Make do with what you have.” I will admit that the normally clear views of the mountains have an air of mystery about them in the photos that I have processed so far from our journey on the Going to the Sun Road. Continue reading

Highline Bridge – Valley City Railroad Trestle

Valley City, North Dakota.

Proud of their reputation as a City of Bridges, Valley City, North Dakota features a tour map at their information center and online here. By far, the most spectacular bridge on the tour is a railroad bridge that not only crosses the Sheyenne River but also spans the entire valley.  The bridge was completed in 1908, it’s needed due to the large changes in elevation that trains needed to transition the valley. The 3860-foot (1,180m), span gently lifts trains to the higher terrain on the western edge of Valley City. At its highest point, the bridge rises 162 feet (49 m) above the valley floor. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 15 November 2020

Quincy, Washington.

This is my third (and final) Cellpic Sunday from the rest area near Quincy. If the photo looks familiar, you may be remembering the image of the lake with the Interstate bridge from a few weeks ago. That image is one-third of three captured in a sequence that shows the entire lake view of Wanapum Lake as seen from that high vantage point. Continue reading

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – The Sun will come out Tomorrow

This week, Ana of Anvica’s Gallery guest hosts the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. Given the ongoing concerns with Covid-19, the uncertainties of modern life, and the ongoing political strife in our country, that song from “Orphan Annie” is a message of hope and that a better day is coming. You can read her entire challenge post here. Continue reading

The Black Viking – Fort Ransom’s Unique Roadside Attraction

Fort Ransom, North Dakota.

Just outside the small town of Fort Ransom, North Dakota is a unique hill. The town of some 75 or so residents is situated near a hill that is almost (but not quite) a perfect pyramid. Geologists believe the hill, like many others in the region, is the result of glacial action and erosion. However, it is not strewn with boulders or rocks, something unique compared to the other glacial hills throughout the region. Many locals believe the pyramid is a Native American burial pyramid about 100 feet (30 m) tall and 5000 years or greater years old. As of this writing, you can take your pick on what you believe. The link here features a video of the controversy and of the discovery of a stone with ancient markings that resemble a musical scale merged with a primitive “Morse Code.” The code has never been deciphered, so it adds to the mystery of Pyramid Hill.

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Cellpic Sunday – 8 November 2020

Olympia, Washington.

On our trip to the western states, we had great weather almost every day. Truthfully with Washington state’s reputation for dreary, rainy weather, we only saw a couple of wet days. It was on a wet Wednesday morning we spent some time in the state’s capital city. We chose to drive by the state capitol buildings to see the grounds. I was struck by the fountains in front of the state’s legislative building. Continue reading