San Antonio River Cruise – Views Along the Urban Waterway

San Antonio, Texas.

A national conference brought me to San Antonio for the first time. Regular readers already know that I spent much of my free time during my week-long stay just outside our hotel enjoying the sights and sounds of the River Walk. Of the many sights and historic locations in this beautiful Texas city, the River Walk is probably the best bang for the buck. It costs you only your time unless you choose to spend your money at one of the many restaurants and other shops that line the canal. You can read more about the canal from my earlier post here. Continue reading

San Antonio River Walk – The American Venice

San Antonio, Texas.

The San Antonio River, named in 1691, and the city of San Antonio have been intertwined for centuries. The first bridge across the river at San Antonio connected the Presidio, a Spanish fort built in 1716, to the Mission San Antonio in 1736. Over the centuries, the population growth of the city created flooding issues on a regular basis. By the 1920s, flood control was a major concern and in 1926, a bypass channel was created. You can read more about the River Walk’s early history from a timeline published here. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 26 November 2017

San Antonio, Texas.

On the late summer trip to San Antonio, I spent a lot of time walking the iconic River Walk. At $7 USD a seat (senior rate), I found myself on the cruise twice, once in late afternoon and once at dusk. In an upcoming Travel Tuesday post, I will share a gallery of images from those cruises. Even though I was using the Sony camera I recently acquired for most images, I always take a handful of shots with my cellphone to feature here on Cellpic Sunday. Continue reading

Cellpic Sunday – 19 November 2017

San Antonio, Texas.

One of the main attractions in San Antonio is the famed River Walk, miles of sidewalk that parallel both sides of a river channel. Though originally built to assist with flood control, a businessman with foresight saw the canal as an opportunity to create an attraction to draw visitors to the city. In the years since its development, many bridges now cross that flood control channel and many tourists stop and shop, enjoy a meal at one of the many restaurants or simply stroll along the canal’s sidewalks. Continue reading